Top Leaderboard, Site wide
August 23, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Help us grow by sharing
and liking Truthdig:
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Newsletter

sign up to get updates


Atlantic Depths May Hold Key to Heat Hiatus






Truthdig Bazaar
Jazz

Jazz

By Gary Giddins and Scott DeVeaux
$26.37

more items

 
Ear to the Ground

An Aristocracy of Musicians

Email this item Email    Print this item Print    Share this item... Share

Posted on Mar 8, 2014

Photo by Jsome1 (CC BY 2.0)

The top 1 percent of artists take 77 percent of the income earned in the music industry, a new report found.

Consequence of Sound reports:

According to the report entitled, The Death of the Long Tail: The Superstar Music Economy, the disparity is complicated by recent developments in the industry. While the income from all recorded music fell by over a billion dollars between 2000 and 2013, artists’ share rose from 14% to 17% in the same span of time. Still, as the report explains, the disproportionate incomes stem from the behaviors and attitudes of fans/consumers, who, instead of embracing the plentiful choices brought forth by the digital music revolution, “have actually been completely overloaded by it.”

The report continues:

The concept of the long tail seemed like a useful way of understanding how consumers interact with content in digital contexts, and for a while looked like the roadmap for an exciting era of digital content. Intuitively the democratization of access to music – both on the supply and demand sides – coupled with vastness of digital music catalogues should have translated into a dilution of the Superstar economy effect. Instead the marketplace has shown us that humans are just as much wandering sheep in need of herding online as they are offline.

In fact digital music services have actually intensified the Superstar concentration, not lessened it (see figure below). The top 1% account for 75% of CD revenues but 79% of subscription revenue. This counter intuitive trend is driven by two key factors: a) smaller amount of ‘front end’ display for digital services – especially on mobile devices – and b) by consumers being overwhelmed by a Tyranny of Choice in which excessive choice actual hinders discovery.

Read more here.

—Posted by Alexander Reed Kelly.

More Below the Ad

Advertisement

Square, Site wide

New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Publisher, Zuade Kaufman   Editor, Robert Scheer
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.