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Ear to the Ground

Defiant Ferraro Defends Her Obama Comment

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Posted on Mar 11, 2008
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As Barack Obama supporters reacted angrily to her claims that the Illinois senator wouldn’t have gotten as far as he has in the ‘08 race if he was white or female, former VP candidate and Clinton fundraiser Geraldine Ferraro said her statements were taken out of context and warned that Obama “shouldn’t antagonize people like me,” since, she said, he’d want her to raise money for him, too.

Update: Ferraro has resigned from Clinton’s finance committee. She wrote to Clinton: “The Obama campaign is attacking me to hurt you. I won’t let that happen.”


Boston.com:

The Clinton campaign quickly distanced itself from Ferraro’s comment, the latest racially tinged remark by a supporter.

Clinton told the Associated Press yesterday afternoon that she did not agree with Ferraro’s statement. “It is regrettable that any of our supporters on both sides—because we’ve both had that experience—say things that kind of veer off into the personal,” Clinton said. “We ought to keep this on the issues. There are differences between us. There are differences between our approaches on healthcare, on energy, on our experience, on our results that we’ve produced for people. That’s what this campaign should be about.”

Ferraro stood by her comment last night on the Fox News Channel, but said, “I’m sorry people thought it was racist.”

Clinton’s comments didn’t satisfy the Obama campaign.

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Leefeller's avatar

By Leefeller, March 13, 2008 at 1:12 pm Link to this comment

Do you actually vote with that brain.

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By mitt, March 13, 2008 at 6:15 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Where’s Obama’s leadership even he says Ferraro’s comment isn’t racist.  He needs to tell all you haters of white women and just plain NASTY supporters to back off. You’ll never win an election with all this BS floating around. I’m appalled that no one researchs any thing, just lie to make yourselves feel better.

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By Douglas Chalmers, March 13, 2008 at 5:42 am Link to this comment

Olbermann is jsut going against Geraldine Ferraro - everyone has their axe to grind and they are endlessly hitting off each other (just like cyrena, uhh).

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mackTN's avatar

By mackTN, March 12, 2008 at 10:19 pm Link to this comment

Fantastic post I share your dismay over this affair

Hillary has to win Pennsylvania after losing so heartily to Obama and the best way to ensure it is to paint him with the tar brush

With so many white people voting for him, HillBill perceived that as influencing other whites to vote for him as well, and we just can’t have that

This is a dangerous game to play; doing so brings out all the crazies and fans the flames of the kind of racism that put lives in jeopardy

If she was any kind of a leader, HIllary Clinton, she would instruct her followers to stop it, that she won’t tolerate any kind of racially coded language, that she won’t find joy in winning that way

Where is your leadership, Mrs Clinton?

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By mackTN, March 12, 2008 at 10:02 pm Link to this comment

Great catch

This entire thing saddens me—but I expected it   I really did not think that Obama would be able to run a raceless campaign Once he started winning, the shit hit the fan

This is how desperate people are—and it happens more times than not

A few months ago, people were exclaiming that racism was dead in this country “Why we are colorblind” 

But this isn’t just Democrats The Republicans realize that this ugliness will elect McCain And that’s why Geraldine and Gloria should have kept her mouths shut And why Hillary and Bill should have kept their mouths shut

But I guess they would rather lose to McCain than to Obama

Disgusting Hillary can only acheive a pyrric victory because if she manages to win the battle, and she won’t, she’ll definitely lose the war

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By republicanSScareme, March 12, 2008 at 9:44 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Tonight, Geraldine Ferraro will appear on national television to prove that she is dead.

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By cyrena, March 12, 2008 at 9:30 pm Link to this comment

Leefeller,

Thanks for the link. Olbermann always manages to put the truth right down front and center.

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By Leefeller, March 12, 2008 at 7:55 pm Link to this comment

Hillary is campaigning as if she is a Republican, according to Keith Olberman on MSNBC.  If any of you missed his well delivered 10 min diatribe on why Hillary needs to be accountable for her peoples actions, Keith did a nice job of cleaning Hillary’s ever so inane clock.  Olberman will feel the wrath of Hillary, we should support his objective and clear view of Hillary’s lack of integrity.


http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2008/03/12/olbermann-slams-clinton-i_n_91256.html

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By cyrena, March 12, 2008 at 7:08 pm Link to this comment

This is soooooo great!!

Don’t ya LOVE seeing from the inside out?

I do.

But, I want to remind you Louise, that this seeing from the inside out, and caring more about who people are than what they look like, is still such a major challenge for so many folks. It’s like they have to just deny the possibility that anything good can actually exist. And when there is the sighting of any bud of growth for that, they have to hammer it down, or plow it under, and do whatever it takes to eliminate the possibility that good/hope/peace/etc can ever possibly return to embrace us all.

So, when you say this:

” And if I thought there was even the tiniest chance she might understand, I might try to explain it. But there isn’t, so I wont.”

I do understand that as well. When your friend contacted you to find out about the black guy with the funny name, you knew he was someone who viewed from the inside out, and so you were able to provide him with the necessary information.

But when there isn’t the tiniest chance that someone can or would understand that concept of looking from the inside out, then it becomes an exercise in futility, and the energy can be spent more effectively elsewhere.

And no, I don’t feel that I’m being the least bit pessimistic or less than hopeful myself, in pointing that out. Rather, I believe that must of us who feel that way, are simply acknowledging the reality of our collective existence here in our collective society.

In fact, the failure to acknowledge reality and to put it in a clear and and bright light, is what has us so downtrodden now.

So, we work with what we have, to get to where we need to be.

Thanks for the essay. It’s another great prompt for me. wink

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By Liza, March 12, 2008 at 7:01 pm Link to this comment

That does it for Ferraro.  Now we can move on to the next stupid comment to be made by Hillary or an associate.  It’s a bottomless pit.

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By jackpine savage, March 12, 2008 at 6:50 pm Link to this comment

Your story reminds me of the scene in True Romance where mob boss Christopher Walken is about to kill cracker security guard Dennis Hopper, because Hopper is lying and Walken can tell…“it’s an old Sicilian trick”, he says.

So Hopper tells Walken the historical story of Moors and Sicily, finishing by calling Walken an “eggplant” and asking, “Now, tell me, am i lying?”  Walken just shoots him.

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By JayPaul, March 12, 2008 at 6:34 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

It is a sad day when a Former VP candidate cannot speak the truth….................

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By Louise, March 12, 2008 at 5:12 pm Link to this comment

Update: Ferraro has resigned from Clinton’s finance committee.

She wrote to Clinton:

“The Obama campaign is attacking me to hurt you. I won’t let that happen.”

Well there you have it.
Classic “It’s not my fault, it’s theirs!”

One more memo to add to the file:

Why we need real change in political leadership in this country.

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PatrickHenry's avatar

By PatrickHenry, March 12, 2008 at 4:37 pm Link to this comment

You nailed it on the head.

I thought she was dead.

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By mackTN, March 12, 2008 at 4:24 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Wow.  History is rewritten, even as we speak!

Funny.  When this race started, most of the black people you so clearly despise supported the Clintons.  I canvassed hundreds and hundreds of people…Clinton, Clinton, Clinton.  Why?  Primarily because of Bill—voting for Clinton would get Bill back in office. 

Of course, I thought that was wrongheaded and the Obama campaign was disappointed not to have the support of the black community.  He was grilled by many prominent black leaders, many of whom supported the Clintons, others John Edwards.

But by South Carolina, Bill indulged in some very paternalistic language and offended the very people whose vote he wanted.  So they took their vote elsewhere. 

Latinos vote for Clinton, women vote for Clinton.  I don’t hear Obama hectoring them for voting their interests. 

Hillary’s marriage to Bill may be a convenience, but it sure provided her with a senate job and a chance at the presidency. 

Of course, a lot of this stuff online is from Roving Republicans who want to stoke the flames of divisiveness and win a third term.  I can’t believe any Democrat would be so stupid as to alienate a needed voter come the general election just because of race.

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By mackTN, March 12, 2008 at 4:05 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Sure. It’s a shame that John Edwards, a rich white man, did not do better in the primaries.  Clearly there is something wrong with this country when a white man cannot be elected to the presidency. 

Black people will always be black—so I guess we’ll suffer the criticism of doing well only because we are black forever.  According to this logic, black people should never run for office because if they do and perform well, it’ll be because they are black.

On the other hand, it’s okay to run if you are a woman who can marry into the job or a child who can inherit the job from a parent.

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By lib in texas, March 12, 2008 at 3:54 pm Link to this comment

D C as usual you make to much sense for the Obamaites
to grasp.  I happen to know Ferraro has done an a huge, huge amount of work for the underprivileged.  Probably a LOT more than Obama, actually a lot more than Obama.  I don’t see how Obama can feel good about the way he is being supported.  The hatefulness if someone has a difference of opinion. If he cared (he has to know) he would address the issue but seems (in my opinion)he just want’s to be president and those supporting him want a black president as he has nothing else to offer.

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By mackTN, March 12, 2008 at 3:53 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Of course they can be criticized, just like any other person.  But why criticize one’s race or gender?  What has that got to do with it? 

Like most, I agreed that Samantha Powers had to go after calling Clinton a monster.  A foreign policy adviser should understand the importance of diplomacy and tact. 

Ferraro’s ad hominen attacks are completely out to lunch, and I think a strategy to inject coded language and images into a campaign by proxy. 

Those of us who are older recognize this language.  We’ve heard it all our lives. 

And you have a perfect illustration of why minorities are so wounded by these things.  These are people who are our teachers, our employers—these are the attitudes they inflict on others.

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By P. T., March 12, 2008 at 3:20 pm Link to this comment

Wrong.  Your swinish ignorance is appalling.

Peace

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By P. T., March 12, 2008 at 2:59 pm Link to this comment

If you have no more than that to add, do America a favor and go elsewhere.

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By P. T., March 12, 2008 at 2:56 pm Link to this comment

Absurd answers.

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By Louise, March 12, 2008 at 2:16 pm Link to this comment

mackTN:
“Why even make the comment?”

I’m reminded of a conversation I had with a few of my favorite folks the day after Obama gave the Keynote Speech at the 2004 Convention in Boston. None of us could remember his funny name, but we had all been so impressed by his speech. His confidence [no script, no notes] his demeanor, his presence. But most of all what he said.

Without so much as one single negative word he touched on every single problem that was causing so much pain.

Without one single promise or threat, he made us realize there could be a brighter tomorrow.

Without one person singled out, he made us feel we were all the same, and more than ever we needed to reach out to everybody and embrace our sameness.

And for those who think I am exaggerating, I suggest you google and find that speech.

Anyhow, we couldn’t remember his funny name. So someone suggested we go on google, type in “The guy at the Democratic Convention with the funny name” and see if we couldn’t find it!

And darned if it didn’t pop right up:
“Barack Obama, Democrats New Super Star”

Well we had a name, and we found the speech and we decided we needed to remember that name and that speech and went back to focusing on Kerry. Who later caved in following Bush’s very fishy win. And the whole country got back to the business of trying to deal with the hell on earth Bush has created and continues to create.

Hope just evaporated.

Which brings me back to:
“Why even make the comment?”

The whole point of my story is, not one time, not once did anyone ask, is he a black guy? Black was never mentioned. Because black was never NOTICED! The speech, the demeanor, the sincerity, the impact, and the funny name. That’s what was noticed.

People who focus on race and gender, typical of “Old School” and repub politics make the comment because that’s the ONLY thing they notice. Which should give us all a clear picture [as if we need one more] of WHY we need change!

A lot of folks see inside out. In other words what a person IS is far more important than what they LOOK like. This may be a concept that eludes someone like Geraldine Ferraro. But apparently the concept is alive and well in the voting democrat populace at large. Hopefully, well actually I know it’s alive and well in a good part of the conservative population as well.

Several weeks after the Convention in Boston, I got a phone call from a “conservative” friend I hadn’t seen or heard from in more than ten years. He wanted to know if I knew the name of that black guy everybody was talking about.

Needs to be noted, he lives in a rural area where seeing a black guy is as rare as seeing chickens fly. But everybody was talking about that black guy with the funny name and he wanted to know what he had missed. I gave him a few links so he could read the speech and inform himself.

I’m happy to report he voted for Obama in his State Primary last month!

And I’m sure Ferraro could never begin to fathom why a retired, conservative, white, educated male, living in rural red state America voted for Obama.

And if I thought there was even the tiniest chance she might understand, I might try to explain it. But there isn’t, so I wont.

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By odlid, March 12, 2008 at 1:53 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

The cold and bitter outlook of Ferraro/Steinem and other husks of the failed neo-feminist effort in this country have succeeded only in weakening every aspect of our society, from university freedom to workplace harmony to the self-respect of growing boys (and their unnaturally weakened state as men) to the absolute trashing of female chances for top leadership. Hillary and her surrogates have reminded American voters that the leadership of the few remaining men will be needed to restore the country to full function. It also has banded men, young and old, in their striving to find wives in Europe and Asia, women who respect their sons and are happy to form a lifelong union with someone who is less than perfect. Thank you, neofems, for making the lives of American women more difficult.

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By Maani, March 12, 2008 at 1:47 pm Link to this comment

P.T.:

Re your second question, you don’t read very well, do you?  Ferraro DOES ask that question about herself, and AGREES that she would NOT have been chosen if she were not a woman.  And that is her POINT.  Which is why the statement, taken in context, is not entirely racist, though it certainly sounds that way.

Peace.

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Leefeller's avatar

By Leefeller, March 12, 2008 at 1:26 pm Link to this comment

Checked out your link and find the comments agreeing with some of the reasons why I prefer Obama over Bush and Hillary. 

Not sure who is sponsoring your link but it has a mild approach to what is , but maybe this is necessary to capture unenlightened people’s minds. 

Not a Repub site is it?  They have a thing about developing sites to pull people in and then dropping them when timing fits their agenda.

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By wagonjak, March 12, 2008 at 1:19 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Dave, maybe you should do us all a “avor” here and GO AWAY!

I find all kinds of “inspiration dialogue” here and in other ProgBlog sites which I never find in the MSM TV or printed media. There is overwhelming support for Obama and his message of hope and optimism for change…and a lot of anger at Hillary for her underhanded attack messages…

But we have been too disappointed by the Bush Government and the Corporate Media not to be more then a bit cynical…

I actually have NO FRIGGIN IDEA what you’re trying to say above…WE LET YOU DOWN?

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By Hammo, March 12, 2008 at 1:12 pm Link to this comment

Many people like Obama because he opposed the invasion and occupation of Iraq and that he is not Hillary Clinton or John McCain.

His being part-black is just another factor in the mix and is not primary.

Ferraro doesn’t get it.

Food for thought in the article ...

“Thoughts on Factors in the Obama Surge”

PopulistAmerica.com
Populist Party of America
February 27, 2008

http://www.populistamerica.com/thoughts_on_factors_in_the_obama_surge

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By Conservative Yankee, March 12, 2008 at 1:08 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Face it folks. Hill-the-business-shill is pissed off that anyone would have the temerity to question her right to the throne.

This corporate whore has always felt “entitled” to a position above everyone else. Above Wal-mart workers, above Arkansas State police, above White House employees, and above the US voters. Marie Antoinette in a pants suit.

I’m dying for her to speak again. Everytime she (or her surrogates) open their mouths, another 100,000 people move away from her. 

Keep your yap ajar Hill. I’m going to love seeing you with your face in the mud!

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By Liza, March 12, 2008 at 12:15 pm Link to this comment

Why is this even news?  It certainly shouldn’t be.  How could anyone possibly care what this woman says about anything?

She was a bit player in politics, her claim to fame being the first woman in the VP position on a losing ticket.  And she had a few terms in the House. 

Now she’s running her mouth, getting her last fifteen minutes of fame.

She needs to shut up.  And the media needs to turn the camera in another direction, but why should they when it is so easy for them to report junk news?  Reporting anything of importance is too much like hard work, apparently.

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By Monte Asbury, March 12, 2008 at 11:57 am Link to this comment

HRC’s 1st run for the Senate in NY would have been unthinkable without the enormous name-recognition of her famous husband. They would not have know who she was. She still uses the connection all she can, putting forth “First Lady,” for instance, as if it were genuine foreign policy experience. Is that element of her career - fame by marriage - a feminist achievement?
How ironic that Ferraro would suggest Obama as the candidate of unearned credentials!

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By Neil Penster, March 12, 2008 at 11:30 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I disagree with Ferraro’s comments. Not because they are racist, they aren’t. They are simply wrong. Obama is where he is today for a host of reasons, not just his color. To be clear, however, his race IS one of those reasons.

The media, on the hand, is using racism in it’s attack on Ferraro. And of course, many blacks have been completely chauvinistic in their response.

This points to one of the open questions about having a black or a woman as president. Can they be criticized, even when the criticism is fair, without their leagues of chauvinist supporters, working hand in glove with a sensation-seeking media, crying fowl. Don’t forget, it’s not been so long since the black community cheered the acquittal of OJ Simpson.

A crucial part of a healthy democracy is the ability to criticize elected officials without fear of reprisal, or ad hominem attack. Are we on the verge of losing this to vocal groups of female or black chauvinists?

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By Sue Cook, March 12, 2008 at 11:20 am Link to this comment

Answer to question 1, who cares?

Answer to question 2, maybe, and more than likely would have won the election because of it.

Answer to question 3, yes, her marriage to him is more of a convience to him than her.

She merely made a comment that happens to be true!
No racism intended.  Think about it.

Obama on the reverse would be just another white man with eloquent talking skills running for president with the same message of other young contenders of the past.  But, I doubt would have the black vote that is winning him most of the southern states that he enjoys now and has given him the lead in delegates and popular votes.

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By Dave, March 12, 2008 at 10:46 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I’m one of the few or maybe one of the many who live elsewhere in the world and regularily check in on your political blogs hoping to grasp a bit of inspirational dialogue between the people of one Nation United through the seeds of hope and optimism for change. Well, sorry to say but I aint finding it. And to think that I had the audacity to hope that I would. You let me down.

  AMERICA, do us all a avor and SHUT UP!

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By Douglas Chalmers, March 12, 2008 at 10:24 am Link to this comment

By the way…....

Obama adviser Susan Rice “herself caused her candidate a headache by saying that neither he nor Clinton is ready to answer the proverbial middle-of-the-night phone call in the White House…”
http://www.boston.com/news/nation/articles/2008/03/12/obama_camp_assails_ferraro_comments_as_outrageous/

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By Douglas Chalmers, March 12, 2008 at 10:14 am Link to this comment

tdbach said:   I think the press is sexist toward Clinton because of the type of woman she is, not just because she’s a woman. She’s tough, confrontational, smarter than they are and not afraid to let them know it – the characteristics of classic feminists that put men ill at ease. .....

But would she make a great president? Would she stumble through a painful, error-prone learning process when we can least afford it, after the horrible mess Bush has left us in? Will Obama…..?

Clinton’s husband made a whole bunch of mistakes when he took office; she thinks she’s learned the lessons from that and can hit the ground running. Whether you agree or not, it’s a fair distinction to try to make, and it’s not mud-slinging….. Obama’s .....a pretty good shot at being elected president. I hope he’s as ready as he thinks he is….

Interesting observation about HRC, tdbach, but that is just the kind of woman who would make the best president. And the USA does   need a woman who will put male leaders across the world “ill at ease” in their misogynist dreamlands just as Nancy Pelosi did when she became house speaker.

The problem for Hillary is not “a keen ear for the messages that resonate with a populace”  but the “soaring oratory”  that you and so many are easily seduced with. That is not a woman’s way - but it IS the favored role of the male bullshit-artist, uhh.

Its disappointing to see that so many also fail to see that a person can “learn from other peoples mistakes” as well as their own experience. If that were true, no-one could learn anything from education - and most probably many of you haven’t, come to think about it, uhh.

No doubt, the fact that so many (mostly male) can’t seem to see a 60-year old as intelligent and capable - and more so than a younger person - just proves that those individuals are as dumb as they imagine others to be. The USA is losing out fast…..... and so too are the Democrats.

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By Aegrus, March 12, 2008 at 10:11 am Link to this comment

Agreed.

Though, here is another way to look at her statement in context.

Ferraro is a New York democrat, which may imply being tied to a political machine. The old politics rule her decisions and her logic. She’s been doing this for years, and knows exactly what gets her elected.

Now, in the context of the question, “Why do you think Obama is gaining so much momentum?” she might have thought about how much she loves Hillary and how she helped Hillary get into the New York senate. She might see herself in Hillary Clinton so much that she just doesn’t recognize what all this fuss is about Barack Obama.

Hope? Inclusion? Ethics Reform? Sorry, Ferraro doesn’t get those kinds of concepts. The only possible reason people are voting for him (since the man stands for nothing but hope and utopia politics as far as she is concerned) is because of his race.

Yeah, it’s a stretch, but I think the mind of a Hillary supporter is stretched.

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By Leefeller, March 12, 2008 at 10:00 am Link to this comment

Tonight Olberman on MSNBC is going to talk about why we should vote for Hillary the kitchen sink candidate.

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By P. T., March 12, 2008 at 9:57 am Link to this comment

Would George W. Bush be president if he were not the son of George H. W. Bush?

Would Ferraro have been chosen as a vice-presidential candidate in 1984 if she were a man?

Would Hillary be a candidate for president if she weren’t married to President Bill Clinton?

Those are some questions Ferraro could tackle.

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Leefeller's avatar

By Leefeller, March 12, 2008 at 9:44 am Link to this comment

Supporting bigoted statements makes a bigot, guess you are just that. 

It is one thing to support your candidate but to support bigoted statements, by saying they are not racist does not make them any less so. Try as you may, your acceptance of these statements shows a lack of integrity we have come accustomed to in the Hillary campaign. 

Just keep telling yourself that the statements were not offensive, live your illusion of righteousness. 

Now the monster statement that was over the top.

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By Douglas Chalmers, March 12, 2008 at 9:30 am Link to this comment

Its true that Barack Obama wouldn’t be a contender in the Democrats’ presidential campaign if he was white or a woman. Hillary Clinton is lucky to have so much support and after the way she has been so viciously attacked, it will be just as hard to get another woman candidate the next time around.

As for being a man, Edwards barely kept up as a white. That is an issue which has not been well-analyzed. But doing so is seemingly forbidden if it in any way criticizes the person of some other color. We know that it would not be the case with an Asian or a Latino - just with African-Americans. Guess why?

Ferraro’s comment was neither “outrageous” nor “offensive” and it is merely the Obama camp (‘The Ring’) screaming in the vain hope that they can thus somehow excuse Samantha Power’s malicious comments last week. Why should Hillary denounce her for speaking the truth?

Also interesting to note that Susan Rice “caused her candidate a headache by saying that neither he nor Clinton is ready to answer the proverbial middle-of-the-night phone call in the White House”, uhh. As such, Obama’s retorts are hypocritical, to say the least.

Very offensive of Fox (what’s new?) to try to marginalize Geraldine Ferraro as somehow not having her own authority to speak and to accuse her of being a Clinton surrogate. Those comments, even though made by a woman journalist, were both sexist and age-ist.

And, of course, Ferraro’s experience with hate emails is just part of Obama’s The Ring campaign’s supporters thinking that they somehow have the right to attack women once they support a black man. That is, racism is out but sexism (and age-ism) is still the ‘in’ thing…......

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By geoffspear, March 12, 2008 at 9:07 am Link to this comment

This reminds me of a comment I heard sometime last year, I believe from Bill O’Reilly (although it could have been another idiot right-wing windbag) who, seeing the Democratic contest as essentially coming down to Clinton vs. Obama, insisted that the Republicans’ only chance of winning in 2008 was to nominate Condi Rice, since, he reasoned, only a black woman would have any chance whatsoever at beating either a white woman or a black man.

I can only assume that this sort of thinking (and Ferraro’s) is symptomatic of the same sort of psychotic paranoid delusions that make people think that American Christians are systematically persecuted (try getting elected to any office at all in 99% of this country as an avowed atheist) in a War on Christmas. 

Ask the 1 in 9 black men between 20 and 34 who are incarcerated in this country how grateful they are to have the massive advantage of being black.  Ask the 20.5% of uninsured blacks just how much less insurance they could have if they weren’t so advantaged. 

Fortunately for the Democratic Party, if this is a calculated move I think Ms. Ferraro will be shocked to find that in the large swath of Pennsylvania that James Carville compared to Alabama, you won’t find too many Democratic primary voters.  Race baiting may very well work here for a Republican candidate in November, but I don’t think it will work in April.

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By Leefeller, March 12, 2008 at 8:52 am Link to this comment

For some reason is did not work the post (More comprhensive) was supposed to be here?

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By Leefeller, March 12, 2008 at 8:48 am Link to this comment

Interesting, I wrote the thread above then read your link and it seems to be in tandem with my concept but much more comprehensive. 

Let’s face it the elite protect their interests no mater what, they do what they want and how they want. People are consumers, cannon fodder and only need to be appeased.

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By Leefeller, March 12, 2008 at 8:39 am Link to this comment

Divisive tactics by Hillary may destroy the Democratic Party, her McCain statements was way over the line.  Hillary has proven she can fill Bush’s shoes, by dividing the county even further.  Her offensive tactics actually seem successful,  it remains to be seen what happens in the next three weeks. 
Hillary supporters feel everything is okey doky, when it comes to slime and mud slinging, devisiveness is accepted and watered down to be. “Oh come on now.”

Entitlement is Hillary’s premise, she is pissed that a new boy on the block like Obama, a wet nosed upstart who has not paid his dues is kicking her ass and making her work for what she deserves.  Old Politics, the good old boys are being upstaged by this new guy on the street.  They resent it.

No magic wands, will make change and if we see change it will be so subtle we may not even notice.  Special Interests may be having second thoughts on Obama, he is moving up quite fast and his indoctrination by the elite may not been completed yet.  People power is not in the cards, Hillary and McCain will fight Obama with everything they can, supported by special interests.

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By thebeerdoctor, March 12, 2008 at 8:21 am Link to this comment

Truth dig members, if you have time, check this out:
http://thebeerdoctor.newscloud.com

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By Leefeller, March 12, 2008 at 8:18 am Link to this comment

Yes Hillary and her cronies say what they want, twist the comments to be what you want.  Covering up a bigot by bringing in the a comparable sexist statement does not make a bigot not be.

Not mud-slinging, if you say so, I still believe it is bigoted. 

It seems Hillary and her crowd love to spill bits and pieces of non issue stuff to confuse the public.  Well the masses may fall for it, it remains to be seen.

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By Expat, March 12, 2008 at 7:39 am Link to this comment

^ you address tdbach, but re: my post.  I’m confused.

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By RdV, March 12, 2008 at 7:11 am Link to this comment

tdbach:
Ferraro is on the Clinton campaign finance committee.
  And I am sorry, but it IS RACIST—since Ferraro has a historical pattern of slamming African-American accomplishment based on skin color. This plays to whites who resent programs like affirmative action, with the white supremist mythology that if blacks didn’t get an artificial leg up that take opportunity away from more deserving whites, then they would still be the inferior race of inferior ability.

And before you go there, I am a woman.
  Your attempts to parse it are pathetic.

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By tdbach, March 12, 2008 at 7:11 am Link to this comment

But this wasn’t “other people’s mistakes.” She was absolutely involved in the trenches with him - particularly during the first year or so when he was doing most of his stumbling. She saw it first hand; she might even have come up with some of the blunders herself. Remember the “buy one, get one free” ditty? She learned - or she should have learned. We’ll see (or not).

This isn’t a different world. It has a lot of new challenges, as every time in history has had except Bush has left an inordinate number of and particularly difficult challenges. But Washington politics is no different, and it’s not going to change with a magic wand of “hope and “change”. I happen to think that Obama is more politically wiley than even (or perhaps especially) his supporters think, and he’ll do all right. But I think he’ll make more mistakes than Clinton to begin with.

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By Expat, March 12, 2008 at 6:54 am Link to this comment

^ point.
I was with you until this; “she thinks she’s learned the lessons from that and can hit the ground running. Whether you agree or not, it’s a fair distinction to try to make, and it’s not mud-slinging. But it looks like Obama’s going to win the nomination, and he has a pretty good shot at being elected president. I hope he’s as ready as he thinks he is.”
Nope, one doesn’t learn from other peoples mistakes.  It’s not a fair distinction.  This surely is a different world and nobody is prepared for what’s coming; after all that was 10 years ago.  Nobody is prepared and the one who can excel is the one not tied to the past.  What’s needed is forward thinking and imagination and most importantly one who doesn’t have all the answers: that’s the one who will listen.  Much missing in today’s world of political doublespeak.  Listening; the lost art.

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By mackTN, March 12, 2008 at 6:53 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

There aren’t many white people who can hear the racial messages that are beginning to seep out of the Clinton campaign.  They’ve never been the recipient of them before; racism—especially the kind that my and clinton’s generation grew up with—is unfamiliar to them. 

But those of us who are middle—aged baby boomers, black, and part of the post civil rights brigade that newly invaded corporate America in the 70s and 80s once the matter of legal discrimination had been settled are now hearing phrases that make me sick to my stomach, remembering just how stressful it was to compete and be accepted in workplaces that had been largely white and male run.

You don’t hear those things like I and many others do.  Twenty, thirty years of running into walls and ceilings and having people treat you like a new species or assume you lived in the ghetto when in fact you lived around the corner from them all your life.  Experience. Qualifications. Boogeymen. 

That these words come from white women who were also newly launched into those corporate battlegrounds for the very first time pains me.  You would think they’d know better….

The truth is this, Geraldine.  Hillary wouldn’t even be a senator if not for Bill.  She certainly wouldn’t have one iota of credibility for the presidency if it weren’t for the fact that she married Bill Clinton.  Take Bill Clinton out of her equation for experience, and she’s left with Walmart and Rose Law firm.

I appreciate that as a crotchety older woman you can say whatever flits through your mind and flies out of your mouth.  But so can I.  And I say, put a sock in it.

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By tdbach, March 12, 2008 at 6:30 am Link to this comment

Ok. Before Obama partisans start jumping up and down and drawing comparisons to Samantha Powers, demanding that Ferraro be “fired” - as though she were more than simply a supporter (who happens to have name recognition), let’s look at what she said. Honestly. Dispassionately.

I see this as another amplification of HRC’s overall theme: that she is more qualified than Obama to be the candidate for president, that he lacks her experience. What she is saying is no more degrading to Obama than that he’s popular because he’s a compelling orator. The fact is, he’s an African-American. If you judge or denigrate him based on that fact, that is racist. If you attribute some unique dynamic to his candidacy – not a personal but a political judgment – because of that fact, that is NOT racist. Would anyone honestly argue that his racial make-up is completely superfluous to his candidacy? You’d have to blow some serious smoke up your arse to think that’s true. I think Obama has created a powerful movement, not just because he gives great speeches, not just because he make a compelling case for hope and change in his messaging, but also because he LOOKS like change. So it seems fair to suggest that his racial make-up is at least a factor in creating so much enthusiasm for his candidacy, not just among blacks, but among white professionals and young voters and the media, and this despite a relatively slender resume.

Where I disagree with Ferraro is where she suggests that the sexism of the press would never allow a woman to get as far as Obama has with so little experience on the national stage. I think the press is sexist toward Clinton because of the type of woman she is, not just because she’s a woman. She’s tough, confrontational, smarter than they are and not afraid to let them know it – the characteristics of classic feminists that put men ill at ease. If a woman came along – say a state senator from Wisconsin – who had a gift for soaring oratory and a keen ear for the messages that resonate with a populace that is tired of things as they are, and she ran for president, she could have similar success to Obama’s, for much the same reason. She would not only appeal to voter’s hunger for change with her words, she would look the part of change herself.

But would she make a great president? Would she stumble through a painful, error-prone learning process when we can least afford it, after the horrible mess Bush has left us in? Will Obama? Clinton’s husband made a whole bunch of mistakes when he took office; she thinks she’s learned the lessons from that and can hit the ground running. Whether you agree or not, it’s a fair distinction to try to make, and it’s not mud-slinging. But it looks like Obama’s going to win the nomination, and he has a pretty good shot at being elected president. I hope he’s as ready as he thinks he is.

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By Expat, March 12, 2008 at 6:22 am Link to this comment

^ in 1961, a friend of mine from high school (black) told me he preferred the south (where he was from) because there, he knew where he stood.  We northerners were hypocrites and he didn’t appreciate that at all.  Having spent some time in Atlanta, Ga., New York. Ny. (from there), Portland, Oregon, Los Angeles, and Seattle, Wa.,  I take exception to your comment there’s “more” racism above the ‘line”.  I’d say it’s pretty evenly spread out across the country.  We aren’t nearly as free of racism as we’d like to think.  We have not come a long way, but we have progressed.  Evidence Obama’s phenomenon.  So, there is hope.  As to Ferraro; who cares, shes stamped herself irrelevant.

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By Conservative Yankee, March 12, 2008 at 6:09 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

The Italians and the Blacks have been battling in New York since I was a baby in Westchester. But as one friend’s father noted (on thanksgiving 1967) “It’s a family fight”

On that long-ago day, his other son was making racist remarks at the table, saying “I’d never serve a nigger.” (the family owned a deli)the father then said, “Please pass the potatoes.” The boy complied, and the father said: “Thank you, but you just served a nigger” The boy laughed nervously awaiting an explanation. The father continued “Where do you think…” He reached across the table and grabbed Tony’s hair… “...formerly blond Europeans got this black kinky hair?”

A one sentence end to “racism” in that household!

Geraldine needs a comparable lesson.

Oh, BTW I like the other side of Ms Ferraro.

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By troublesum, March 12, 2008 at 6:09 am Link to this comment

Since the North Carolina primary the Clinton campaign has been so offensive that I will not vote if she wins the nomination and I have always voted democtatic.  I hope others will do the same.  We should not be so afraid of McCain that we would consider voting for anyone as low down as Hillary Clinton.

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By Aegrus, March 12, 2008 at 5:36 am Link to this comment

People still don’t realize their is more racism above the Mason-Dixon line. Farro is just a disgusting human being.

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By Expat, March 12, 2008 at 5:03 am Link to this comment

^ know about this?  More shallow reporting I guess.

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By RdV, March 12, 2008 at 4:42 am Link to this comment

A Ferraro flashback

“If Jesse Jackson were not black, he wouldn’t be in the race,” she said.

Really. The cite is an April 15, 1988 Washington Post story (byline: Howard Kurtz), available only on Nexis.

Here’s the full context:

Placid of demeanor but pointed in his rhetoric, Jackson struck out repeatedly today against those who suggest his race has been an asset in the campaign. President Reagan suggested Tuesday that people don’t ask Jackson tough questions because of his race. And former representative Geraldine A. Ferraro (D-N.Y.) said Wednesday that because of his “radical” views, “if Jesse Jackson were not black, he wouldn’t be in the race.”

Asked about this at a campaign stop in Buffalo, Jackson at first seemed ready to pounce fiercely on his critics. But then he stopped, took a breath, and said quietly, “Millions of Americans have a point of view different from” Ferraro’s.

Discussing the same point in Washington, Jackson said, “We campaigned across the South . . . without a single catcall or boo. It was not until we got North to New York that we began to hear this from Koch, President Reagan and then Mrs. Ferraro . . . . Some people are making hysteria while I’m making history.”

http://www.politico.com/blogs/bensmith/0308/A_Ferraro_flashback.html

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By Expat, March 12, 2008 at 3:40 am Link to this comment

^ their own.  So they’ve come to that; isn’t this where Hyenas come in and grab the young?

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By PatrickHenry, March 12, 2008 at 3:15 am Link to this comment

Ferraro’s conjecture.

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By writeon, March 12, 2008 at 2:05 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Her comments are offensive. They remind me of the attitude of kindly, firm, but fair slave owner, who is rebuking a house-slave who’s gotten above his station and crossed over the line. A good whipping, for his own good, is what’s required.

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By Seanchai, March 12, 2008 at 2:03 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I speak with some authority on the subject, having been involved (and actually trained to understand and facilitate discussions) in racism and its prevention and reduction for well over 30 years. And I am a Caucasian male of Irish descent.

Ms Ferraro’s comments, combined with her attitude about them after being challenged, betray a clear lack of judgment and a very strong tendency toward basing some of her opinions about Mr. Obama on his race.

We call this racism, especially as it is being cited as an opinion about his qualifications to run for president. I guess his other accomplishments mean nothing and his speaking ability is not a factor - just his race.

When George Bush ran for President in 2000, that was an example of race in action - a man of any other racial background would never have been able to run as he did. It was also clearly the fact of his father’s occupation that made any of his life beyond the coke and drinking even remotely possible.

I don’t recall Ms Ferraro making such a statement then. Now, as an attack-dog for the Clinton machine, and in the best traditions of Rove-ian politics, she has again interjected race into the campaign.

This is a sick move at best and certainly one that bears repudiation by any Democrat who lived through any part of the Civil Rights era, understands the difference between race-aided achievement and pure human ability, and desires to participate in an honest discussion of issues and differences between the candidates.

I truly regret ever having voted for Ms Ferraro, who is a classless, hate-mongering fool and deserves to be less than the sorry footnote she now is in American History.

I cannot believe that Hillary Clinton is going to take this campaign into this lowly realm. Her non-denial denial today shows where she is in all of this. Say that Obama is a demagogue or that he is a silver-tongued whatever - but he has great oratorical skill. He also seems capable of staying with issues and differences that relate to being president, while Clinton tries to personally undercut him for a primary battle she can’t and won’t win.

Endorsing McCain over Obama was the last straw for me. I have now gone full circle from an unabashed strong supporter of hers to a Democrat who absolutely will not vote for her under any circumstances.

And this turnabout is 100% due to how she has conducted herself in this campaign. She is nothing more than another “W” a spoiled millionaire who believes she has a right to be President, a divider of people incapable of doing what’s right if it means self sacrifice.

Enough is enough. Her campaigning for McCain has begun, I suppose in the faint hope that he’ll pick her as his running mate. Good luck.

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By weather, March 12, 2008 at 1:46 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Bend way over, scoop down and steal a page from the Ann Coulter scrapbook of cheap, snotty invective.

This should be a time of comity in your hapless, impotent party but its a sophmore pissing contest, that only speaks to an event horizon free of adult leadership.

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