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Ear to the Ground

A Blow Against the Common Cold?

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Posted on Feb 17, 2008
kid sneezing
eb.com

It turns out a little echinacea might go a long way toward preventing a cold and reducing the duration of a cold, especially when combined with vitamin C. A new study published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases analyzed 14 other studies and flies in the face of other research that has showed no positive effect from echinacea.

Part of the problem, researchers explained, is that there are many products out there that contain some part of the echinacea flower, and this variation causes problems in testing. They were also careful to point out that more work needs to be done, and the safety of echinacea products checked, before people act on their findings.


BBC:

Researchers, led by Dr Craig Coleman from the University of Connecticut School of Pharmacy, combined the results of 14 different studies on Echinacea’s anti-cold properties.

In one of the 14 studies the researchers reviewed, echinacea was taken alongside vitamin C. This combination reduced cold incidence by 86%.

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By Aegrus, February 18, 2008 at 7:04 am Link to this comment

Thanks for that identification, JS. Isn’t it shameful how a corporation has to make a profit before we can have access, information or even name recognition of something which might help us reach better health?

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By jackpine savage, February 18, 2008 at 5:17 am Link to this comment

Everything old is new again.  Native people have known this for how many centuries?

We can all grow it ourselves, by the way, the plant is generally called coneflower at your local garden center.  Its a native American prairie flower, perennial and drought resistant…rather lovely too.

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By jackpine savage, February 18, 2008 at 5:14 am Link to this comment

Probably.

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By GrammaConcept, February 17, 2008 at 9:16 pm Link to this comment

Smiling, literally, Smiling…also strengthens the immune system due to stimulation of the thymus gland through this facial gesture…..

It’s an exercise…You all can do it….

Strive On…

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By troublesum, February 17, 2008 at 6:26 pm Link to this comment

If you take echinacea at the first sign of a cold it will lessen the severity or prevent it all together.
It is important that what you are taking is from the root of the plant not the flower which is not as potent or effective.  Echinacea strenthens the immune system.
It was in the news this week that avian or “bird” flu had broken out in Indonesia and that at least 100 people had died.  Two years ago when it was first reported amoung birds it was said that if it were transmitted to humans it would spread like wildfire and that there would be a pandemic.  Now there seems to be no more news after that initial report about the outbreak in Indonesia.  It was also reported that this year’s flu shot has only a 40% effective rate.  Are the main stream media and the government covering up something so as not to cause a panic?

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