Top Leaderboard, Site wide
September 23, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Help us grow by sharing
and liking Truthdig:
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Newsletter

sign up to get updates






A Chronicle of Echoes


Truthdig Bazaar
Becoming Abigail

Becoming Abigail

By Chris Abani

more items

 
Ear to the Ground

Overdue Review of Spy Program Lacks Muscle

Email this item Email    Print this item Print    Share this item... Share

Posted on Nov 28, 2006
Glenn Fine
washingtonpost.com

Justice Department Inspector General Glenn Fine (right) confers with a colleague during a 2003 hearing.

The Justice Department will, at long last, examine the NSA’s domestic spying program, through which agents have eavesdropped on countless phone calls and e-mails.  Unfortunately, the review will not explore the legality of the program and was described by one Democrat as an attempt at appeasement.


International Herald Tribune:

The inquiry by Glenn A. Fine, the department’s inspector general, will focus on the role of Justice prosecutors and agents in carrying out the warrantless surveillance program run by the National Security Agency.

Fine’s investigation is not expected to address whether the controversial program is an unconstitutional expansion of presidential power, as its critics and a federal judge in Detroit have charged.

“After conducting initial inquiries into the program, we have decided to open a program review that will examine the department’s controls and use of information related to the program,” Fine wrote in a letter dated Monday to House and Senate leaders on judiciary, intelligence and appropriations committees.

The review also will look at “the department’s compliance with legal requirements governing the program,” according to the four-paragraph letter obtained by the Associated Press.

Justice Department spokesman Brian Roehrkasse said the agency welcomes the review: “We expect that this review will assist Justice Department personnel in ensuring that the department’s activities comply with the legal requirements that govern the operation of the program.”

In January, Fine’s office said it did not have jurisdiction to investigate, as requested by more than three dozen Democrats, the legality of the secret program that monitors phone calls and e-mails between people in the U.S. and abroad when a link to terrorism is suspected.

Fine’s letter outlining his review was welcomed by congressional Democrats. At the same time, they said it falls short of examining issues at the heart of the debate—how the spying program evolved and whether its creation violated any laws.

“A full investigation into the program as a whole, not just the DOJ’s involvement, will be necessary,” said Rep. Zoe Lofgren, a California Democrat.

Link

More Below the Ad

Advertisement

Square, Site wide

New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

By Quy Tran, November 29, 2006 at 11:20 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

The best way we can do is to shred this program,  drop it into toilet then flush to the ocean to keep our environment clean and clear from virus.

Report this

By whymrhymer, November 28, 2006 at 9:47 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

TRACKBACK:

FYI: I’ve linked to your post from my article at “My View From the Center”.

Rgds,

Whym

Report this
 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Publisher, Zuade Kaufman   Editor, Robert Scheer
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.