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Ear to the Ground

Holocaust Archive Tells a Fuller Story

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Posted on Nov 18, 2006
archives
dw-world.de

Files on display in Berlin offer a glimpse of life in the Nazi death camps, while millions of documents at the Bad Arolsen archives remain mostly under lock and key.

The International Tracing Service, an arm of the Red Cross that houses 16 miles of floor-to-ceiling files related to the Holocaust, is slowly granting access after half a century of silence.


AP via Yahoo!:

BAD AROLSEN, Germany—The 21-year-old Russian sat before a clerk of the U.S. Army Judge Advocate’s office, describing the furnaces at Auschwitz, the Nazi death camp where he had been a prisoner until a few weeks previously.

“I saw with my own eyes how thousands of Jews were gassed daily and thrown by the hundreds into pits where Jews were burning,” he said.

“I saw how little children were killed with sticks and thrown into the fire,” he continued. Blood flowed in gutters, and “Jews were thrown in and died there”; more were taken off trucks and cast alive into the flames.

Today the Holocaust is known in dense and painful detail. Yet the young Russian’s words leap off the faded, onionskin page with a rawness that transports the reader back to April 1945, when World War II was still raging and the world still knew little about gas chambers, genocide and the Final Solution.

The two pages of testimony, in a file randomly plucked off a shelf, are among millions of documents held by the International Tracing Service, or ITS, an arm of the International Committee of the Red Cross.

This vast archive—16 miles of files in six nondescript buildings in a German spa town—contains the fullest records of Nazi persecutions in existence. But because of concerns about the victims’ privacy, the ITS has kept the files closed to the public for half a century, doling out information in minimal amounts to survivors or their descendants on a strict need-to-know basis.

This policy, which has generated much ill-feeling among Holocaust survivors and researchers, is about to change.

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By MARIAM RUSSELL, November 20, 2006 at 11:22 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Yes, davr, it was a terrible crime.

But it has been used to justify another of its kind…....ISRAEL.

SOMEONE, PLEASE EXPLAIN THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN ARIEL SHARON KILLING EVERYONE IN A TOWN AND HITLER KILLING EVERYONE IN A TOWN? IS IT THAT THE BODY COUNT IS NOT AS HIGH? WHO HAS BEEN COUNTING THE BODIES? ONCE THE JEWISH STATE GETS THE BODY COUNT TO 6,000,000 WILL THEY STOP?

PLEASE NOTE, I SAID THE JEWISH STATE, NOT THE JEWISH PEOPLES. THERE IS A DISTINCTION, YOU KNOW.

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By davr, November 20, 2006 at 3:10 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

The holocaust was a terrible crime.

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