Top Leaderboard, Site wide
Shop the Truthdig Gift Guide 2014
December 18, 2014
Truthdig: Drilling Beneath the Headlines
Sign up for Truthdig's Email NewsletterLike Truthdig on FacebookFollow Truthdig on TwitterSubscribe to Truthdig's RSS Feed

Get Truthdig's headlines in your inbox!


Go West, Young Han
Weather Extremes Rise as Planet Gets Hotter and Colder






Truthdig Bazaar
Ravens in the Storm

Ravens in the Storm

By Carl Oglesby
$16.50

Los Angeles: City of Dreams

Los Angeles: City of Dreams

By Bill Boyarsky
$12.15

more items

 
Ear to the Ground

10 Reasons to Break Up With Bank of America

Email this item Email    Print this item Print    Share this item... Share

Posted on Oct 29, 2011
Rainforest Action Network (CC-BY)

Pranksters posted a sign on a Bank of America ATM that read: “Bank of America Is Temporarily Closed Until such time as it invests responsibly in renewable energy and divests from the dirty coal industry.”

In case you’re wondering what all of the commotion is about regarding big banks and the “rapacious” financial services industry, here are 10 of the biggest sins of a megabank and 10 reasons not to do business with it, according to Truthout’s Nomi Prins. 

Do you have anything to add? Let us know in the comments section below. —Alexander Reed Kelly

Nomi Prins at Truthout:

1. B of A rejects the right of customers to protest. When two Occupy Santa Cruz protesters in California marched into a local Bank of America to close their accounts, the response was, “You cannot be a protester and a customer at the same time,” followed by a threat to call the police if the women didn’t leave. (The attending officer later reiterated the bank manager’s message.) Meanwhile, the fact that Bank of America charges a fee for closing an account prompted Rep. Brad Miller (D-North Carolina), who resides in Bank of America’s headquarters state, to introduce a bill to protect customers from such fees.

2. To recoup ongoing losses from its stupendously dumb acquisitions of Countrywide Financial and Merrill Lynch, B of A pillages its customers. Thus, despite massive public outrage, the $5 debit usage fee for customers with less than a $5,000 balance and no mortgage with the bank will begin in 2012. B of A was the first large bank to confirm it would charge this fee, which is the highest in current discourse among the banks.

On October 18, Consumers Union wrote a letter to B of A chief Brian Moynihan asking him to reconsider this fee, which impacts poorer clients disproportionately. The letter summed it up nicely: “Consumers should not be required to pay a costly fee that appears to be arbitrary and designed to generate income to make up for Bank of America’s bad business decisions rather than covering the costs of providing debit card services.” Banks collect 24 cents from retailers for each customer swipe, much more than the median 8 cents it costs a bank to process the purchase. Senator Dick Durbin’s (D-Illinois) response was to urge customers: “Vote with your feet. Get the heck out of that bank.”

Read more

More Below the Ad

Advertisement

Square, Site wide
TAGS:


Get truth delivered to
your inbox every week.

Previous item: Dismal Reports From Two U.S. Inequality Studies

Next item: Cover-Up at the Cathedral



New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

oddsox's avatar

By oddsox, November 7, 2011 at 1:23 pm Link to this comment

@ardee, you ask:
“Do you actually believe that the “flippers” as the term implies are such a large number that their greed led to this crisis?”

No, my last comment was anedotal. 
At the same time, these were not all greedy people. 

Now one friend went nuts with it and even her lender told her to throttle back, (but kept making the loans for her.)
Of course, she was the first one to lose: 5 homes in all, including her own residence, all gone.

But others were just trying to get in on a booming market.  Another friend bought his home, did a refi the next year and upgraded to a nicer residence for his growing family.  He kept the first house as a rental. 
He was making good money, too, was thinking of buying a 3rd home. 
He was in the car biz.  You can guess what happened next.
He ended up losing all equity in both houses—each were sold as short sales. 
His was a more typical story.

Anybody who bought or refi-d in 2004 or later is probably under water unless they had a lot of equity to begin with.  That’s bad enough. 
But what’s really disturbing is many 2008 buyers are now underwater as well. 

As I mentioned two comments ago, I’m not laying blame here. 
I think there’s a lot of it to go around, though.  Bush, Franks, Dodd, Raines, Johnson and others come to mind & there are others in the banking world, too. 
Add a little caveat emptor to the soup as well, sure. 

Going forward, you know the drill:
Reinstate Glass-Steagall & use anit-trust action to
break up the too-big-to-fail banks.
Forgive my redundancy, but:
http://open.salon.com/blog/oddsox/2011/10/10/too_big_to_fail_too_big_to_begin_with

It’s gonna be a while (2 years? 5 years? 10 years?)but eventually, we’ll get back to a normal win-win housing market. 
But first we have to flush out those 1.5M foreclosures you mentioned, Ardee, and a bunch more coming.

Report this

By ardee, November 7, 2011 at 11:22 am Link to this comment

oddsox, November 6 at 9:03 pm

One million foreclosures to date. Another one and one half million reported to be in the pipeline. Do you actually believe that the “flippers” as the term implies are such a large number that their greed led to this crisis?

Do you really think to defend the Goldman Sachs’ of the world by blaming the relatively few who did seek profit, especially when those at the top made billions and the few either made modest profit or lost it all.

Report this
oddsox's avatar

By oddsox, November 6, 2011 at 9:03 pm Link to this comment

@Egomet Bonmot:
I was fortunate during the run-up as well.  Didn’t lever up, so I didn’t get hurt so much on the downturn. 

I know people (sure you do too) who were buying houses like playing Monopoly, all levered to the max. 

Of course, if the bubble had lasted they’d be very rich, which was the idea.
If the last 5 years had been like the 5 before that, I mean.

Report this
Egomet Bonmot's avatar

By Egomet Bonmot, November 6, 2011 at 7:48 pm Link to this comment

oddsox,

Thanks much for your post and sorry to not have replied earlier.  Yes I remember the days of rationality in real estate, the 2%-7% growth you describe.  In my more paranoid moments I wonder if the Bush admin actively encouraged the bubble after the upheaval of 9/11 as a way to ensure social stability.  If everyone is working overtime to pay a thirty-year debt, they’re too tired to worry about terrorism.

Fortunately for me I was broke at the time.  If I’d had enough for a down payment I’d certainly have jumped on the bandwagon.  Indigence is the easiest way to be a contrarian investor.  grin

Report this
oddsox's avatar

By oddsox, November 2, 2011 at 9:20 am Link to this comment

@Egomet Bonmot, you write:
“In the zero-sum game of an appreciating real estate market,you’d win and the late buyer would lose.”

Historically, the real estate market has appreciated and has been a win-win proposition.  Buyers and sellers move due to changes in their life cycle.

These changes may be positive: marriage, growing family, relocation, retirement downsizing.  Or negative: debt, death, divorce. 

In most cases sellers profit from cumulative modest appreciations (2%-7% per annum).  Buyers gain from owning property better suited to their needs, tax breaks and the promise of a modest profit when they sell.

That was turned on its head by the housing bubble & inevitable bust.  The huge swings from 20-30% annual gains to similar losses eliminated the win-win scenario.  Who to blame?  Save that for another discussion.

The good news is, residential real estate will one day return to the normal.

The bad news is it won’t be for at least another 2 years, probably more like 4-7 (this is how the talking heads and experts like RealtyTrac and Kiplinger see it), or 7-10 years if the pessimists are right.

Otherwise, a fine post, Egomet.
I join you in wishing the best for Artsy, who is by no means alone. 
Market prices average about 50% of what the were at the market peak, which was June 2006 nationally, October 2005 where I live. 
High-end properties have held their values better, but have lately softened as well.

Report this
Egomet Bonmot's avatar

By Egomet Bonmot, November 1, 2011 at 10:23 pm Link to this comment

Artsy,

First let me offer what was missing from my previous post, sympathy for your predicament.  It’s awful to be in the kind of straits you describe, and I wish you nothing but a swift improvement.

It seems to me that your situation is a little different from the average homeowner who has taken a haircut, and that the realtor and MB’s fraudulent assessment might be grounds for a strong lawsuit or, at the very least, a renegotiated mortgage. But I respectfully have to ask some tough caveat emptor-type questions.  Years ago I bought a cheapass one room condo for fifty grand, and even on that piece of junk I had my own seperate assessment made.  If you’ve ever bought a used car you’ve probably taken it to a mechanic to get a second opinion.  Had you considered doing as much for your house?

Please understand me, I’m not trying to pile on.  Full disclosure:  I made and then lost a fortune in the dotcom bubble of 2000.  I hate the results of my decisions but I live with them.  Some other stakeholders sued, I didn’t.

You probably bought for two reasons, to have your house and to participate in its appreciation.  One of those reasons has evaporated—although the seller & realtor certainly had no legal duty to guarantee appreciation.  You dislike that your mortgage has been tranched off to some less-than-legitimate processing company.  What earthly difference does that make to your particular situation?  Bundling isn’t illegal, and unsavory people are legally allowed to own your debt.  I’m not sure I even want that to be illegal, any more than I want to disallow bad people from having cash in their pocket.

The other reason you bought still greets you every morning, your beautiful house.  Yes if you had bought now you’d owe far less, but I just don’t see the legal responsibility of sellers or realtor-brokers to guarantee an up market.  Let’s be clear:  If your house were now worth double what it was you’d be happy.  You would have profited from an investment that worked to the effective *detriment* of anyone who had delayed buying when you did.  If they then bought your appreciated house you would profit from your successful investment, hand delivered to you by your new buyer, and you certainly wouldn’t let your fraudulent early appraisal stop you from keeping the profit.  In the zero-sum game of an appreciating real estate market, you’d win and the late buyer would lose.

But the market went the other way.

Speaking personally, if I had a crippling mortgage that was a third of its write value I’d walk away from it, without hesitation, and start banking my money from the confines of a nice rental.  Yes it’s like a broken mirror, seven years of bad credit, but over the cocurse of a decade with hundreds of thousands in net worth retained the bad memory will fade fast.  If up to now you’ve only seen $50 of your principal paid down then you signed a mortgage that was toxic from the gitgo.  Only in America can someone buy a half-million dollar asset and still call themselves an unsophisticated investor.

Good luck in any case, Artsy, and speaking from the other side, I’ll quote Conan O’Brien from his recent Dartmouth speech, viewable on YouTube (and way better than Steve Jobs’s):  “Nothing is more liberating than having your worst fears realized.”

And that’s the truth.  As Dan Savage would say, it gets better.

Report this
Artsy's avatar

By Artsy, November 1, 2011 at 6:20 pm Link to this comment

Egomet: I was told that they looked at it both by the realtor and the mortgage broker and I was charged dearly for it too. Come to find out just recently after seeking the help of another lawyer to have the mortgage reduced, that an appraisal was never done. I was lied to, just like thousands, and perhaps millions of others.

It utterly amazes me that you automatically ASSUME that I am at fault. I have a graduate level education and I closed my deal with the help of an attorney.

People who think as you do are simply and sadly misinformed.

Report this
Egomet Bonmot's avatar

By Egomet Bonmot, November 1, 2011 at 4:33 pm Link to this comment

“BofA just dumped my excellent Countrywide fixed rate mortgage off to some poorly thought of processing company called Green Tree. I still do not know who really owns the mortgage. It should be noted her that no-one ever even looked at the property I purchased to appraise it. Nobody ever looked before the loan was given, NOBODY!  Today, my property is worth 1/3 what I paid for it and “under water” is an
understatement. How can this be allowed in a country to claims to be lawful? They have ripped me off very badly.”


So you admit you signed and closed a mortgage on a property no one ever looked at.  Didn’t that raise your suspicions?

If the market had risen and your property were now worth twice its old value, would you be looking for someone else to blame, or taking credit for being such a savvy investor?

Report this
Artsy's avatar

By Artsy, November 1, 2011 at 8:08 am Link to this comment

BofA just dumped my excellent Countrywide fixed rate mortgage off to some poorly thought of processing company called Green Tree. I still do not know who really owns the mortgage. It should be noted her that no-one ever even looked at the property I purchased to appraise it. Nobody ever looked before the loan was given, NOBODY!

Today, my property is worth 1/3 what I paid for it and “under water” is an understatement. How can this be allowed in a country to claims to be lawful? They have ripped me off very badly.

BofA kept my so called “home equity line of credit” which is a malicious, disgusting abuse of “fair lending” laws. It also originated with Countrywide. I have been making diligent payments since the beginning of 2005 and less than $50 of the balance is gone. Highway robbery? Hardly. More like RAPE.

I so wish that someone in power would really stand up for the people and take these banksters down. They should all be in jail.

Report this
oddsox's avatar

By oddsox, October 31, 2011 at 4:52 pm Link to this comment

“Last Monday, Bank of America was charged (along with JP Morgan Chase and Wells Fargo) with colluding with the two major credit card companies, Visa and MasterCard, to keep ATM fees high; in other words, they were charged with “price-fixing,” in direct opposition to antitrust laws.” 
—reason #3

Ok, now I’m excited again.
Time to USE those Antitrust laws.
Break up the Too-Big-To-Fails!
http://open.salon.com/blog/oddsox/2011/10/10/too_big_to_fail_too_big_to_begin_with

Report this
oddsox's avatar

By oddsox, October 31, 2011 at 4:35 pm Link to this comment

damn…

I got all excited for nuthin’

Thought for a moment the title of read:
“10 Reason to Break Up America’s Banks.”

... damn

Report this

By ardee, October 31, 2011 at 3:16 pm Link to this comment

Egomet Bonmot, October 31 at 7:33 am Link to this comment

You got me there.  I don’t have time to hunt up a bunch of horror stories about credit unions.

Disingenuous alert…You raised the issue and now rather that stand behind your words you weasel.  I guess your future efforts here will be colored and viewed with increasing skepticism.

Credibility is and always will be important. Those with character know this.

Report this

By Gerald Franco, October 31, 2011 at 11:33 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

I was a resident of Isla Vista, a students community nearby Goleta, California in late 1960’s and early 70’s. Yes, that was where a BofA agency was burned and no student was at fault: after a whole bunch of us taken to court, all were acquited, except one poor bastard who was found guilty of a misdemeanor and fined some 500bucks.

Would you believe, even Leo Panetta was with us, leading a lawyers’ office in the Bay Area who went against the U. of California for their semi-enslavement practices and for treating blacks and chicanos as second class citizens.

In those days justice was with us, after all we had a student killed and several taken to jail, just to be liberated two days later with local judges beging us to forgive the local Police and Sheriffs office for their malefices to the community.

After that many of us became weary of all banks and went into the Community Credit Cooperative, which is a good way out from this mess which are them banks.

But they did pretty well from then on; BofA invented the credit card, this idiocy that defrauds people from their moneys, inviting them to become dependent of a mass-madness which is banking.

Frankly, do you want to know what I feel so many now years passed: FUCK BofA !!!

Good luck in this endeavor.

Report this
Egomet Bonmot's avatar

By Egomet Bonmot, October 31, 2011 at 7:33 am Link to this comment

You got me there.  I don’t have time to hunt up a bunch of horror stories about credit unions.  I’ll concede you the point.

Why does Truthdig sell golf shirts?

Report this

By ardee, October 31, 2011 at 4:30 am Link to this comment

Ardee:  My experience of a credit union twenty years ago was pretty awful, as is my wife’s with hers right now.  Fees are insane.  The negative anecdotal experience is everywhere, ymmv.

Well then,my dear BonMot, the proof should be easily acquired. As my decades long association with my credit union is the antithesis of what you claim to be your own I think finding and posting such proofs of your position should be a piece of cake for one as smart as you.

Links such as these, for example:

http://abcnews.go.com/Business/ConsumerFinance/helpful-tips-switching-banks-credit-unions/story?id=14804344

http://articles.baltimoresun.com/2011-10-10/business/bs-bz-bank-fees-credit-union-20111010_1_credit-unions-big-bank-customers-banks-plan

http://www.bing.com/news/search?q=credit+unions+and+banking+feess&qpvt=credit+unions+and+banking+feess&FORM=EWRE

http://www.app.com/article/20111030/NJBIZ/310300009/NJ-community-banks-credit-unions-offer-alternatives-to-big-bank-fees?odyssey=mod|mostview

http://www.associatedcontent.com/article/9097573/goodbye_bank_hello_credit_union.html

Report this
Payson's avatar

By Payson, October 30, 2011 at 2:47 pm Link to this comment

It isn’t easy to avoid banks altogether.  The school district that employs me only
pays me via direct deposit into my checking account.  We are not even given an
option of a paper check.  Most banks and credit unions will not even cash a check
for you unless you have an account.  I did some research and found that changing
to a credit union within distance of my home wouldn’t save me any money.  I don’t
earn very much and live in NYC, so I don’t exactly have very much money to
transfer in the first place.

Yet again, I feel that these decisions made by the financial industry and/or our
government only affect people like me(working class) and completely ignore the
negative effects that result.  We are trapped in a system that only allows us to
participate in the economy if we follow unfair rules and don’t complain.

Report this

By litlpeep, October 30, 2011 at 2:02 pm Link to this comment

Well, Senator Durbin’s answer was creative, if still a hand-wringing Democratic Senator’s typical whining variation on business as usual: “What can we do?  Our hands are tied up grasping all that money they are stuffing into our re-election campaign pockets!”

Report this
mrfreeze's avatar

By mrfreeze, October 30, 2011 at 9:31 am Link to this comment

Egomet Bonmot - Your experiences with credit unions is interesting. But since you are making some legitimate points about CU’s, allow me to say the following:

I do business with 2 credit unions. I have never had a problem with either in terms of transactions, loans, etc.. And frankly, I would rather a CU or community bank charging me fees than pay them to the large banks. At least those fees are not paying for the CEO to fly his/her corporate jet to the office every morning or stuffing my mail box full of their f*****g propaganda or watching their goddamn commercials on the TV every 2 seconds.

Credit Unions must compete in the phony “free market” environment created by the banks and their enablers (can you say “bail out money”.....which the CU’s DID NOT get). This is why their fees must compete to a certain extent…but for better or worse I’m going to put my money in a local institution. Screw BofA, Wells Fargo and all the rest of the loan sharks out there.

Report this

By NotBofA, October 30, 2011 at 8:41 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

Enough is enough, vote with your feet and leave BofA, everything you need is right here -  http://www.notbofa.org -including a way to find a good local bank or credit union, and funny form letters to choose from pre-addressed to the CEO telling him why you are leaving.  Some examples “because I’m mad as hell”, “because that money is mine”, “because I’m a greedy capitalist”, “because I’m a patriot”...

Report this
Egomet Bonmot's avatar

By Egomet Bonmot, October 30, 2011 at 8:12 am Link to this comment

Boycotting grapes is a lot easier than boycotting a car or bank.  People get paychecks, and every single institution that accepts them for deposit wants their vig.

I still say there’s no good framework or movement in place to help transfer this vast personal wealth into better hands.  Outrage can only take you so far.  If my small bank is nickel and diming me as much as the larger ones then exactly what statement am I making?  That I’m proud of my bank for not getting as rich as the megas?

Ardee:  My experience of a credit union twenty years ago was pretty awful, as is my wife’s with hers right now.  Fees are insane.  The negative anecdotal experience is everywhere, ymmv.

Report this

By Jim Yell, October 30, 2011 at 8:04 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

You want to destroy the greed of banking? Close your credit accounts and pay cash. It is that easy. Electronic Banking is a Trojan Horse device, once instituted you will lose all control over your own money.

In the olden days when coins had smooth edges and were made of Gold and Silver, dishonest people would shave the edges of the money, until it was not what it was meant to be. Then some very bright person figured out if you put grooves all around the edge of the prescious coinage than people could easily see if the coin had been shaved.

Now we have electronic banking where there is a constant invention of “New Fees” for services not rendered, or even services that are already paid for by the customer through the fact that the banks do not pay tax on a large part of their income as it is considered operating expense for income tax purposes. So the customer actually is paying twice for the service.

Let’s bring back usury laws and since so much of the Right Wing wants to bring God back to government, lets bring back the Biblical injunction to charge no more than 3% interest?

Report this

By pyrrhon, October 30, 2011 at 7:40 am Link to this comment

The people have enormous power but don’t use it. It is called boycott. Why in the world would any body want to do business with any of these predatory banks?  It is insane.
The best alternative to big banks is the community bank. Any community bank that survived the 08-09 crash is probably safe. My bank even gives me 2% interest on my checking account.
But most important, if the people of this country would just stop doing business with these known robbers, we would bring them to their knees or better yet put them out of business.

Report this

By ardee, October 30, 2011 at 3:58 am Link to this comment

Egomet Bonmot, October 29 at 10:50 pm Link to this comment

No one’s providing any ground support for people who want to leave the big banks.

Uncertain as to why anyone would need any help in deciding that usurious fees are intolerable. Leaving B of A , or any other such shady financial institution is rather a simple process. One’s new bank will handle the transfer and the consumer will be better off for having done so.


MoveYourMoneyProject dot org is a great idea but a suck website.  Credit unions are loved in theory but despised in practice—they’re as awful to their customers & predatory in their fees as big banks, if not worse.

As a member of a credit union for almost three decades I must stand to defend such from your rather all encompassing and , at least in my own case, completely incorrect slander. I pay NO fees whatsoever for any and all transactions. I do the majority of my banking on line as well and it is all trouble free. My CU credit card has the lowest interest rate of any of my cards as well. Further I have financed vehicles through my CU and have found the interest charged to be superior to any banks fees.

Perhaps you might show some proof of your assertion that credit unions are not only as bad but worse than banks.

Report this

By SoTexGuy, October 30, 2011 at 3:52 am Link to this comment

I’m thinking very many of BoA’s new $5.00 fees are going to be paid by the average taxpayer whether or not they have $5K in deposits or even enjoy a BoA account.

It works like this; subsidies, grants and who knows what all else that is handed out by the government for all reasons are increasingly managed through commercial banks and debit cards. A lot of those debit cards are BoA cards. Recipients of these programs many times have no bank account at all, much
less 5K in deposits. So they get the $5 a month, $60 a year hit.. that lessens their grant but comes right out of tax revenues allotted to the program.. and our taxes.

About those grant programs themselves and the possible waste of money and time and more.. read about just one aspect of them in the October Harper’s Magazine article; “Leveling the field: What I learned from for-profit education By Christopher R. Beha..

Adios!

Report this
Outraged's avatar

By Outraged, October 30, 2011 at 12:08 am Link to this comment

Sorry, I see that link didn’t hypertext, here it is:

http://motherjones.tumblr.com/post/12106698306/thedailywhat-postage-paid-protest-of-the-day

Report this
Outraged's avatar

By Outraged, October 30, 2011 at 12:06 am Link to this comment

This guy has a good idea.  Occupy Wall Street without
leaving your home. Check out this video:
http://motherjones.tumblr.com/post/12106698306/thedaily
what-postage-paid-protest-of-the-day

I like the slogan, “If you can’t occupy wall street you
can at least keep wall street occupied.”

Report this
Egomet Bonmot's avatar

By Egomet Bonmot, October 29, 2011 at 10:50 pm Link to this comment

No one’s providing any ground support for people who want to leave the big banks.  MoveYourMoneyProject dot org is a great idea but a suck website.  Credit unions are loved in theory but despised in practice—they’re as awful to their customers & predatory in their fees as big banks, if not worse.

When someone figures out how to make it easy and fun to leave your megabank, the world will change.

Report this
Outraged's avatar

By Outraged, October 29, 2011 at 9:59 pm Link to this comment

Article: “Now, B of A had a nasty incentive to
kick people out of homes faster, rather than work
with them to refinance or restructure mortgages. Two
months later, their foreclosure process has, in fact,
sped up.
Bank of America foreclosure notices are surging again
following a slight robo-signing- related slowdown,
meaning they are now sending out a greater
increase in default notices (90-day overdue loans)
than other banks.”

It is questionable how many of these loans are
“overdue”.  I know someone who had a loan through
BofA and in this particular case, they were never
late, ever.  They had always paid online and have
more than half of their home paid off.  Suddenly BofA
sends them a notice claiming that they had “a late
payment”(and a “late fee”).  After weeks of repeated
phone calls attempting to clear up the matter they
got nowhere.  Finally they went to a local credit
union and refinanced their home.  Luckily they were
in a position to do that, many aren’t.

But I found it suspicious that they DID NOT clear up
the matter, when it could easily have been rectified.
This home was NOT underwater as it had be bought long
before the bubble and was half paid for. (maybe their
trying to recoup some of their other loses)

Report this
 
Monsters of Our Own Creation? Get tickets for this Truthdig discussion of America's role in the Middle East.
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Zuade Kaufman, Publisher   Robert Scheer, Editor-in-Chief
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.

Like Truthdig on Facebook