Winner 2013 Webby Awards for Best Political Website
Top Banner, Site wide
Apr 19, 2014

 Choose a size
Text Size

Top Leaderboard, Site wide





The Divide


Truthdig Bazaar
Dog Woman

Dog Woman

By Chris Abani
$14.20

Risk, Ambiguity and Decision

Risk, Ambiguity and Decision

By Daniel Ellsberg
$101.79

more items

 
Arts and Culture

Top Authors Lend Their Names to Anti-Surveillance Campaign

Email this item Email    Print this item Print    Share this item... Share

Posted on Dec 10, 2013
Vikramjit Kakati (CC BY-NC-SA 2.0)

Author Arundhati Roy figures among the group of top writers who signed the anti-surveillance petition.

At least they’ll put it really well: A coalition of more than 500 major writers from some 81 countries has composed and signed a petition condemning the increasing violation of civilians’ privacy by state-sponsored surveillance programs.

The league of literary heavyweights—including Martin Amis, Don Delillo, Margaret Atwood, Arundhati Roy, Jeanette Winterson, Hanif Kureishi (and Björk thrown in for good measure)—are not just protesting but also coaxing the United Nations to intervene by drafting an international bill of digital rights to keep state agencies in check when it comes to citizens’ digital communications and other confidential information. Their inspiration came in part from Edward Snowden’s work in exposing the extent of government involvement in the personal realm.

The Guardian brought word of the wordy posse’s entreaty Tuesday:

Julian Barnes, Martin Amis, Ian McEwan, Irvine Welsh, Hari Kunzru, Jeanette Winterson and Kazuo Ishiguro are among the British authors on the list.

It also includes JM Coetzee, Yann Martel, Ariel Dorfman, Amit Chaudhuri, Roddy Doyle, Amos Oz, David Grossman, and the Russian Mikhail Shishkin.

Henning Mankell, Lionel Shriver, Hanif Kureishi and the antipodean writers CK Stead, Thomas Keneally and Anna Funder are other globally renowned signatories.

The Guardian has published a series of stories about the mass surveillance techniques of GCHQ and its US counterpart, the NSA, over the past six months; two of the most significant programmes uncovered in the Snowden files were Prism, run by the NSA, and Tempora, which was set up by GCHQ. Between them, they allow the agencies to harvest, store and analyse data about millions of phone calls, emails and search-engine queries.

Though Tuesday’s statement does not mention these programmes by name, it says the extent of surveillance revealed by Snowden has challenged and undermined the right of all humans to “remain unobserved and unmolested” in their thoughts, personal environments and communications. “This fundamental human right has been rendered null and void through abuse of technological developments by states and corporations for mass surveillance purposes,” the statement adds.

“A person under surveillance is no longer free; a society under surveillance is no longer a democracy. To maintain any validity, our democratic rights must apply in virtual as in real space.”

 

—Posted by Kasia Anderson


New and Improved Comments

If you have trouble leaving a comment, review this help page. Still having problems? Let us know. If you find yourself moderated, take a moment to review our comment policy.

Newsletter

sign up to get updates


 
 
Right 1, Site wide - BlogAds Premium
 
Right 2, Site wide - Blogads
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 
 
 
Right Skyscraper, Site Wide
 
Join the Liberal Blog Advertising Network
 

A Progressive Journal of News and Opinion   Publisher, Zuade Kaufman   Editor, Robert Scheer
© 2014 Truthdig, LLC. All rights reserved.