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Arts and Culture

7-Year-Old Bags More Than $200K for Original Artwork

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Posted on Aug 3, 2010
Williamson painting
picturecraftgallery.com

Things to do when you’re 7: Make a picture like this one by Kieron Williamson, painting prodigy.

A collection of scenic paintings by 7-year-old British boy Kieron Williamson sold out in a very short time for a very hefty amount of money—we’re talking half an hour and $236,000—at a gallery in Norfolk last weekend. That’s enough scratch to make the tedious nicknames that those clever media people can’t help but bestow upon the lad, such as “Mini Monet,” worth it, eh Kieron? Don’t spend it all in one place.  —KA

ABC News:

People from as far away as South Africa, Arizona and New Jersey showed up at the Picturecraft Art Gallery to purchase the prodigy’s prized work. Many camped outside the gallery for two days awaiting the 9 o’clock sale, gallery owner Adrian Hill said.

“Kieron is painting so far in advance of his own years,” Hill said. “There are many talented artists out there, but I can’t think of one that’s made such an impact at such a young age.”

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Anarcissie's avatar

By Anarcissie, August 9, 2010 at 12:18 pm Link to this comment

rollzone—If you don’t read I am mystified as to how you discerned what I had written.  But passing over this miracle, I would like to know if you would pay $120,000 out of your own pocket for the painting shown.  Because if so, and if you actually have that kind of money, I know quite a few artists and gallery owners who urgently desire to talk to you.

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Sabagio's avatar

By Sabagio, August 9, 2010 at 10:40 am Link to this comment

Art and gold have been hedges against inflation, invasion,indiscretian and insanity the beginning of time and before. If the kid’s getting $200k per pic, it’s the art market that’s paying. What I’d really like to know is what is the going price today of pictures painted by Picaso and Andrew Wyeth when they were 7-year olds?  Have their talents as prodigies paid off?

Sabagio Mauraeno in Decatur, GA having nothing else better to do than sit around waiting for Tuesday’s runoff election day .

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By rollzone, August 6, 2010 at 10:40 pm Link to this comment

hello. thanks for the book referral, but i don’t read. it would be fun to debate the value of this work, but i want to mention what i read was this was part of a collection, and even if it was only worth just over $100k, seriously this has to be eye candy before the competitive interest drives up a price. if someone else sees value equal to whatever baseline i hold as value, it originates from the composition itself. there has to be the talent which captures attention. i see a $120k piece there. i argue incongruities and angles and form detract only from more critical appraisal, and no one is saying this is a $60million masterpiece. it is a shame he sold this, and did not save it to later paint in beautiful people and make the composition today just a background. i am saying as it exists it would fly as a background to a masterpiece, and in that quality it stands on its own merits, worth $120k. the whole effect takes me outdoors. like art.

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Anarcissie's avatar

By Anarcissie, August 5, 2010 at 12:46 pm Link to this comment

rollzone, August 5 at 1:53 pm
‘hello again. what, me worry? i can respect the intellectual evaluation of capitalist investment, but i disagree with it being the predominant motivation to purchase art. ...’

There’s a book you should read, titled I Bought Andy Warhol, which goes into the fun and games of the art trade at its more elevated levels.  There’s a review at http://www.artezine.com/archive/14/ibought.html which I like, and it has a link to the Amazon page.

Of course, this doesn’t apply to the bus driver who pays $200 for a painting in a fence show because it will look good over the couch, or even the works of good-but-unknowns selling in the low thousands.  Up at six figures, though, people are really, really concerned with investment value, and it shows.  (In the above book, and in the arts magazines.)  That seven-year-old’s painting is nice, but there’s nothing six-figure about it—except the long-shot potential I mentioned.

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By rollzone, August 5, 2010 at 9:53 am Link to this comment

hello again. what, me worry? i can respect the intellectual evaluation of capitalist investment, but i disagree with it being the predominant motivation to purchase art. each beholder brings their unique interpretation, and in this instance the age is remarkable, but the quality speaks for itself. when i was in the second grade, i painted a round yellow circle and called it a sun, and a brown upright form with a round green top, and thought my cartoon tree image was acceptable. the value to me is more that, i would bear looking at this on a vision blocking wall, to improve my interior environment over an acceptable length of time, to validate purchasing it. the price climbs when more people feel the same. nobody would buy my art if i paid them. the price he got was a reflection of his talent in creating quality art, and may still climb exponentially as his talent and quality improves, but not because a wealthy snob chose to gamble on him as an investment. he got what it was worth in today’s market, in comparison to what else is available in the market. these pieces had nothing to do with cashing in on name recognition. celebrate the talent by encouraging and appreciating his work. if this child becomes a truck driver, it will be our potential loss, or trucks are going to be reflected differently in art. how can anyone say this child is not already an artist?

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peterjkraus's avatar

By peterjkraus, August 5, 2010 at 9:12 am Link to this comment

Contrats, seven year old kid! Not bad—when I was
TEN I started making $$ by mowing lawns with a hand
mower, a towel and the stupidity of thinking a buck a
lawn was good money. But then, it WAS a while ago.
The button on my hat said I Like Ike and the patch
next to it featured Alfred A. Newman, whom nobody
knew except for the neighbor’s kid and me.

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peterjkraus's avatar

By peterjkraus, August 5, 2010 at 9:12 am Link to this comment

Contrats, seven year old kid! Not bad—when I was
TEN I started making $$ by mowing lawns with a hand
mower, a towel and the stupidity of thinking a buck a
lawn was good money. But then, it WAS a while ago.
The button on my hat said I Like Ike and the patch
next to it featured Alfred A. Newman, whom nobody
knew except for the neighbor’s kid and me.

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Anarcissie's avatar

By Anarcissie, August 5, 2010 at 8:18 am Link to this comment

Looks mighty skillful for a 7-year-old.  I suppose it’s possible.

The money is sort of silly, but about 98% of the price of a work of art is the belief of the buyer in investment value, not a witness of aesthetic value.  There is a long shot that the child may someday have a famous career, in which case an early work could be worth millions.  Game theory, then, prescribes a modest investment now.  (Hundreds of thousands of dollars being a modest amount for many collectors.)

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By carlinnyc, August 5, 2010 at 3:22 am Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

From what I can see, there’s nothing original about his paintings. However, for a seven- -year-old, he has an excellent eye for color and a mature paint application method.

I wish him all the best.

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By nubeewon, August 4, 2010 at 11:34 pm Link to this comment

Most people would be tickled pink if they could paint like this.

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By rollzone, August 4, 2010 at 8:57 pm Link to this comment

hello. i see an excellent application of color and perspective in a two dimensional style that would be envied by artists at every age, so if this is as stated ‘a child’, he is possibly the greatest applicator of environmental protection to a flat surface in our lifetime. i am constantly amazed by technology, whereby 200 years ago, this work and this individual may have remained unseen forever; and at the age of seven he is already getting global recognition, and money to pursue his talent. i pray he is not ruined by fame, and makes a cognitive choice about applying or not, a third dimension in style. i find his painting pleasant to view.

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By berniem, August 4, 2010 at 6:33 pm Link to this comment

I wonder if that ayatollah cockamamie who hates music would also find this kid’s “scribblings” not in the highest ideals of islam?

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By NYCartist, August 4, 2010 at 2:43 pm Link to this comment

I’m happy for him.

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By mark shell, August 4, 2010 at 2:22 pm Link to this comment
(Unregistered commenter)

his paintings are pretty good - my daughter is an artist (7 years old) her style is more like Picasso / Miro - she has done several Monet style paintings - but that is not the type she likes to do. A lot of her work is also very good - although she does drop back to plain kids art because of course she is a child. You can see some of her art at http://www.wix.com/kasart/kas - she is also into acting and just completed a short movie “A 60 Minute Brother”

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By WriterOnTheStorm, August 4, 2010 at 7:28 am Link to this comment

Looks promising, but caveat emptor. Let’s just hope it doesn’t turn out like those
other prodigy painter hoaxes.

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